2008/10/15

Two ways of tying a sash to show different front designs

From Nagamochiya, --Nagamochiya is a kind of commission based kimono shop. Tons of unused nice kimonos offered from non-professional individuals. If they wouldn’t be sold in 3-6 month, they would be returned to the owner. So every time you visit, you can see new ones, --I bought Edo bingata dyeing on zenmai tsumugi weave Nagoya obi. It still has tacking on it. Why your ex-owner didn't use you? Although you have such a special weave and dyeing!
Front designs are, one-side mostly plain violet and the other side pretty flowery pattern. So I tried to show both designs with different kimonos. Although I always tie obi sash as anti-clockwise.
To tie sash with clockwise is called Kansai (western Japanese) maki. Tying anti-clock wise is called Kanto maki (eastern Japanese). I don’t know why we call so. Kyoto women are tying clock-wise?

With nice assistance by my kitsuke helper, I could complete my first Kansai maki trial. Thanks god we didn’t have quarrel!

Kanto maki
One layer komon kimono
Violet gauze cotton-linen kimono under
Violet gauze collar (same cloth with kimono under)
Violet sash scarf
Violet-silver sash belt


Kansai maki
One layer Zenmai tsumugi kimono
Violet gauze cotton-linen kimono under
Violet gauze collar (same cloth with kimono under)
Violet sash scarf
Violet-silver sash belt

MMM other than kimono, all the same. I need more creativity…
Gray grid pattern komon kimono was from an antique kimono shop Ikeda. The sleeve is too long as you see. At the next kimono laundry, I will ask to make kimono unfasten and re-sew for my size. Yellow zenmai tsumugi was originally tailored lined. But because of its color and Tokyo’ s town heat, I remade it one layer. I am sure this was a nice idea!